The world Prophecy of Majeshi Leon For Kagame,Rwanda and The people Of Rwanda.

Dated: Sunday, 24 July 2011. 15:11hrs The Journal Inyangenews.com interviewed MAJESHI Leon about his Prophecy which will be published in ...
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Amabanga y’Ikuzimu mu karere k’Ibiyaga bigari.

Uyu muryango washinzwe nabanyafurika bakundaga umugabane wabo w'Africa, ariko uyu muryango wageze mu mabako yabayobozi bo mu karere k'ibiyaga bigari ...
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Germany’s Batty Plan to Deter Migrants  by Stefan Frank

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Islamic Extremism: Who is Purest of Them All?  by Giulio Meotti

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Locked up in the Islamic Republic of Iran  by Denis MacEoin

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Why William Ruto must become President before 2022 election

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A Gruesome Christmas under Islam

Muslim governmental officials — not “ISIS” — in nations such as Brunei, Somalia, and Tajikistan continue openly and formally to express their hostility for Christmas and Christianity. And extremist Muslims — not “ISIS” — continue to terrorize and slaughter Christians on Christmas in nations as diverse as Bangladesh, Belgium, the Congo, Germany, Indonesia, Iran, Nigeria, Philippines, Syria, the West Bank, and even the United States.


On Christmas Day in the West Bank, two Muslims were arrested for setting a Christmas tree on fire in a Christian-majority village near Jenin. On the same day in Bethlehem, Muslim rioters greeted the Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem with a hail of stones. Authorities subsequently arrested 16 “Salafi radicals” who were planning to carry out terror attacks against tourists celebrating Christmas.

If this was Christmas in Bethlehem — Christ’s birthplace and scene of the Nativity — Christmas in other parts of the world experienced similar abuse.

In the United States, a 46-year-old Christian mother of three was among the 14 people killed in the San Bernardino terrorist attack targeting a Christmas party. Ironically, Bennetta Bet-Badal had fled Iran for the U.S. when she was 18 to escape the persecution of Christians after the 1979 Islamic revolution. After graduating from college with a degree in chemistry and marrying and raising three children, the jihad caught up with her. She was attending a Christmas luncheon and bringing gifts to her co-workers when Muslim terrorists burst in and massacred them.

Belgium resembled Bethlehem: A video appeared showing a number of youths lighting a firebomb under a Christmas tree in Brussels. Seconds later, there is an explosion, and the tree is engulfed in flames. Young men shouting “Allahu Akbar,” [“Allah is Greater”] run away. The person who originally uploaded the video, Mohamed Amine, has since taken his Facebook page down.

In Germany, four Eastern Orthodox Christians were accosted in the early morning hours after Christmas Day in Berlin by a man shouting, “I am a Muslim! What are you?” The man and his friends then attacked and violently beat the Christians.

The few anecdotes of Muslims terrorizing, beating, and even killing Christians on the occasion of Christmas in the West — where Muslims are minorities — were expanded in Muslim-majority nations.

Stifling Christmas

In Syria, the Islamic State “arrested, if not executed, some youths [five] in the city of Raqqa for befriending and greeting Christians on the occasion of Christmas.” ISIS reportedly told the five youths that “they are being detained after an investigation [including their personal computers], found that they greeted the Christians and wished them a Happy New Year.” When one of the youths tried to clear himself, an ISIS member replied: “Shut up! You accompany the Christians — is that not so?” The five youths were then hauled to an unknown location. There has been no further information on their fate.

ISIS was not alone. The governments of three countries — Somalia, Tajikistan, and Brunei — formally banned Christmas (celebrating its Gospel message, putting up trees, dressing like Santa Claus, and giving gifts). Transgressors can face up to five years in prison. Some Islamic clerics in Brunei stated: “Using religious symbols such as crosses, lighting candles, putting up Christmas trees, singing religious songs, sending Christmas greetings … are against the Islamic faith.”

In Bangladesh, churches skipped traditional Christmas midnight mass because of the increasing number of threats against, and attacks on, Christian leaders. Although Christians constitute less than one percent of the Muslim nation, more than three dozen church leaders received death threats and at least four narrowly escaped attempts on their lives.

Although not canceled, Christmas church services were tense and on high alert in the supposedly most “moderate” Muslim nation, Indonesia. More than 150,000 security personnel and others were deployed to safeguard churches around the country during Christmas and New Year’s Eve celebrations. Days earlier, on December 20, police arrested six men who had bomb-making materials and jihadi literature.

On December 25 in Iran, a group of about 10 Christians celebrating Christmas were verbally abused and arrested after plain-clothes government agents raided a private service in their home. Separately, on December 23, agents beat, handcuffed, and arrested a Christian man during a raid on his home. His books, computer, mobile phone, and a decorated Christmas tree were seized.

Christmas Carnage

On December 24 in the Philippines, Muslim jihadis terrorized the Christian-majority nation after they seized and executed 10 Christians. A military spokesman said the terrorist attack was intentionally launched on Christmas Eve “to make a statement.”

On December 25 in Nigeria, the Islamic group, Boko Haram, slaughtered 16 Christians, including children. The jihadi group has been bombing churches and massacring Christians on Christmas Day for several years in a row. One of the deadliest attacks occurred in 2011, when the jihadis bombed a Catholic church during Christmas mass. They killed 39 and wounded hundreds.

On Christmas Eve in the Democratic Republic of Congo, over 50 people of the Christian-majority nation were massacred by the Ugandan-based group, ADF-Nalu, which “has acquired in recent years the characterization of a jihadist movement.”

On Christmas Eve in Iraq, the Islamic State bombed ten Christian homes and a convent in the Assyrian village of Tel Kepe. Several people were injured. On December 30, members of the Islamic State bombed several Christian-owned restaurants in Syria; 16 people were murdered.

Left: The Miami restaurant was bombed by the Islamic State, one of three Christian-owned restaurants bombed in Qamishli, Syria on December 30, killing 16 people. Right: A number of youths set fire to a Christmas tree in a public square in Brussels, Belgium, while yelling “Allahu Akbar” [“Allah is Greater”].

Muslim governmental officials — not “ISIS” — in nations such as Brunei, Somalia, and Tajikistan continue openly and formally to express their hostility for Christmas and Christianity. And extremist Muslims — not “ISIS” — continue to terrorize and slaughter Christians on Christmas in nations as diverse as Bangladesh, Belgium, the Congo, Germany, Indonesia, Iran, Nigeria, Philippines, Syria, the West Bank, and even the United States.

Raymond Ibrahim, author of Crucified Again: Exposing Islam’s New War in Christians (a Gatestone Publication, published by Regnery, April 2013), is a Shillman Fellow at the David Horowitz Freedom Center and Judith Friedman Rosen Writing Fellow at the Middle East Forum

A Few Questions for London’s New Mayor and Other Luminaries by Robbie Travers

  • London Mayor Sadiq Khan has called moderate Muslims “Uncle Toms” – not quite what one would expect to hear from a supposed advocate of equality.

  • The irony of course is that to show you are not a racist, you are using racist terminology. Is that what an anti-racist should sound like?
  • Name-calling is usually just a form political blackmail designed to close down a discussion before it has even begun. What it does not wish to take into consideration is that someone might simply have a different opinion.
  • Every candidate’s record on terrorism should be questioned. It is the public’s right. Just because Khan happens to be Muslim, does that entitle him to special treatment? Why should one not be able to ask Khan the same questions one might ask any other politician?

Many are hailing the election of London’s new mayor, Sadiq Khan, admirably the “son of a Pakistani bus driver,” as the sign of a new, tolerant London and that Britain’s Black and minority ethnic communities are making progress.

But there are concerns. Khan has called moderate Muslims “Uncle Toms” – not quite what one would expect to hear from a supposed advocate of equality.

The irony of course is that to show you are not a racist, you are using racist terminology. Is that what an anti-racist should sound like?

Branding someone an “Uncle Tom” also implies that the poor primate cannot think independently or formulate an opinion apart from his ethnicity. Basically, the accusation would seem an attempt to intimidate those within a community to conform to whatever the group-think is; anyone who disagrees must therefore be a traitor. But name-calling is usually just a form political blackmail designed to close down discussion before it even begins. It seemingly does not wish to take into account that someone might just have a different opinion.

It is unfortunate that the Mayor of London, a city of such diversity of both opinions and demographics, would use such terminology to suggest that Muslims who disagree with the more conservative interpretation of Islam are possibly traitors to their religion.

In fairness, Khan has stated that he “regretted” using the term. It is refreshing that a politician took the responsibility to apologize, but might there nevertheless be room for a few candid questions?

Does Khan believe, for instance, that law-abiding, moderate British Muslims are disloyal to their community for holding views that might differ from those of the majority? Also, does he think that using terminology such as “Uncle Tom” makes it more difficult for liberal or progressive Muslims to promote reform within their community? In fact, what does Khan think of the idea of reforming or reinterpreting Islam?

Earlier, in 2006, Khan defended London’s mayor at the time, Ken Livingstone, now suspended from the Labour Party “for bringing the party into disrepute” after MPs accused of him of antisemitism and making offensive comments about Hitler supporting Zionism.

Khan has since condemned Livingstone for remarks made about the Holocaust, and even added:

“I accept that the comments that Ken Livingstone has made makes it more difficult for Londoners of Jewish faith to feel that the Labour party is a place for them, and so I will carry on doing what I have always been doing, which is to speak for everyone.”

It is certainly promising that, as his first official event since attaining office, Khan attended a Holocaust memorial event, and said that Labour has not done enough to tackle antisemitism.

Well then, how, within Labour, does he plan to tackle the rising antisemitism?

Khan’s judgement about advisers, however, has also raised concerns. Khan’s former top adviser, Shueb Salar, began working for him in 2014, when Khan was Shadow Justice Secretary and Shadow Minister for London. Salar’s duties included “assisting in the drafting of speeches, reports, press releases, briefings, parliamentary questions, letters and email correspondence.”

Yet, while Labour’s own written material claimed that “Labour means fighting for “fairness, justice and for equality, Salar tweeted about a same-sex couple travelling on London’s Underground system: “Had the funniest tube journey ever, some rowdy chavs were cussing these 2 gay guys kissing LOL maybe they deserved it.”

Did he mean that assaulting same-sex couples is acceptable and to be expected? He also made other remarks that could be construed as homophobic.[1]

In the wake of polls illustrating that 52% of UK Muslims think that homosexuality should be illegal, what does Khan think of views such as this?

On another topic, a few years ago, in 2004, Khan shared a platform with five Islamic extremists at an event sponsored by Al-Aqsa, and featuring “gender segregation.” The organization has published materials by Holocaust denier Paul Eisen which challenge “the ideological, spiritual and religious meaning of the Holocaust narrative and the use to which it has been put to enforce Jewish power.” What does Khan think about the Holocaust, the views of Al-Aqsa, Eisen and gender segregation?

In 2004, when Khan was chair of the Muslim Council of Britain’s legal affairs committee, he commented on remarks by the Islamic theologian, Dr. Yusuf al-Qaradawi at the Select Committee on Home Affairs. The Muslim Council of Britain, which Khan represented at the hearing, had described Al-Qaradawi “a voice of reason and understanding. “

“Oh God,” al-Qaradawi had said, “deal with your enemies, the enemies of Islam. Oh God, deal with the usurpers and oppressors and tyrannical Jews. Oh God, deal with the plotters and rancorous crusaders.”

Khan responded:

“I cannot comment on the specific quote you have given but there is a consensus among Islamic scholars that Mr. al-Qardawi is not the extremist that he is painted as being by selective quotations from his remarks.”

Unfortunately, Qaradawi also cited a passage in the Hadith [the actions and sayings of Muhammad] — a passage, incidentally, that is also part of the Hamas Charter:

“The Hour will not come until the Muslims fight the Jews, with Muslims fighting them until the Jew hides behind rocks and trees, and the rocks and trees saying: ‘Oh Muslim, Oh servant of Allah, this Jew behind me, come kill him.'”

Al-Qaradawi has also stated that rape victims who dressed immodestly must be “punished,” but also that, “to be absolved from guilt, a raped woman must have shown good conduct.” Al-Qaradawi also defends female genital mutilation (FGM), a crime in the UK.

What, then, are Khan’s views on FGM, rape, anti-Semitism and Qaradawi? What, in fact, are his views on Islamic extremists?

Finally, in 2006 Khan signed a letter declaring that “the debacle in Iraq” had contributed towards terrorism affecting the UK. It is not clear if Khan was suggesting that British foreign policy actively creates terrorism, or if British Muslims, angered by the alleged murder of innocent Muslims in the Middle East, think that the best way to counter British foreign policy is to kill more innocents in the Middle East.

What, then, does Khan think are the main causes of terrorism? What does Khan think about Islamists and how they become radicalized?

In conclusion, why do some people suggest that asking Khan questions about Islam and Islamic extremism is somehow “Islamophobic”? Is it possible they are afraid of what the answers might be?

Shouldn’t every candidate’s record on terrorism be questioned? Is that not the public’s right? Just because Khan happens to be Muslim, should this entitle him to special treatment? Is failing to evaluate someone, using the same standards you would use to evaluate others, just because of his or her race, religion, sexual preference or gender is, not, in the broadest sense, “racist”?

Why should one not be able to ask Khan the same questions one might ask Jeremy Corbyn, David Cameron or any other politician?

Do “inconvenient” questions come about because people are racist, or because they might just be horrified by events such as the murder in Glasgow of a shopkeeper, Assad Shah, killed by another Muslim for wishing his friends a “Happy Easter” on Facebook?

Most of all, why are questions considered so dangerous that they must not even be asked?

Robbie Travers, a political commentator and consultant, is Executive Director of Agora, former media manager at the Human Security Centre, and a law student at the University of Edinburgh.

A Call on All Christians to Defend Their Birthplace and the Homeland of the Jewish People by Petra Heldt

  • We need ensure that the Old City of Jerusalem, the heart of Judaism for more than 3,000 years and the seat of Christianity for 2,000 years, will not be allowed to be Islamic as part of what would soon be an Islamic country, and very likely a terrorist one. In such a state, all polls show that the next vote will be to install Hamas.

  • Based on the Hamas Charter that denies Israel’s right to exist, the vote could complete eliminating Jewish — and Christian — history and replacing it with Islam.
  • What drives Western politicians to be servants aiding the destruction of Judeo-Christian culture in the Middle East and Europe? Why does the Paris peace conference prepare for the destruction of the Jewish State while Christians are murdered in Muslim countries in historically unparalleled numbers?
  • Christians will not be silent when all these places will be voted to go to those who will destroy them — as they destroyed Palmyra, Antioch, Nisibis, Niniveh, and in late 2014, Iraq’s oldest Christian monastery, St. Elijah, leveled by the Islamic State.
  • The streets of Paris must hear the protests against the attempted rewriting of history at the peace conference and any subsequent Security Council vote. Such protestors are like “a man who would built up the wall and stand in front of God in the gap on behalf of the Land” (Ezekiel 22:30) — so that the only bastion of democracy, the very defender of Christianity, the last keeper of Judeo-Christian heritage in the Middle East and Europe will continue to prosper.

Christians’ collective consciousness must stop the planned peace conference in Paris on January 15-17, and prevent the presumably intended UN Security Council (UNSC) vote on a Palestinian State as a 22nd Muslim state, in the midst of the one Jewish State. We need to ensure that there will be no capitulation to the Islamization of the Middle East and Europe. We need to ensure that the Old City of Jerusalem, the heart of Judaism for more than 3,000 years and the seat of Christianity for 2,000 years, will not be allowed to be Islamic as part of what would soon be an Islamic state, and very likely a terrorist one. In such a state, all polls show, the next vote will be to install the terrorist group Hamas. That would mean the eventual destruction of all Judeo-Christian heritage, as we have been seeing throughout the Middle East.

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) on 13 October 2016 gave preliminary approval to a resolution that denies Jewish ties to its most holy religious sites: the Temple Mount and the Western Wall. The vote in Paris could firmly establish the Temple Mount as a Muslim place. Since UNESCO’s rewriting of history, by renaming ancient Biblical sites Islamic, such as Hebron’s Cave of the Patriarchs and Rachel’s Tomb near Bethlehem, even though there was no Islam until the seventh century (hundreds of years later), Muslim guards on the Temple Mount already attempt to impose UNESCO’s revisionist agenda. On January 1, 2017 the Waqf (an Islamic trust to preserve whatever has ever occupied by Muslims for Allah, forever) forced the eminent Israeli scholar of archaeology, Professor Gabriel Barkay, not to use the word “Temple Mount” but the Muslim word for the place. After Israeli police intervention, Barkay continued his talk using the abbreviation “TM.” He refused to behave like a dhimmi (second-class, “tolerated” citizenship for non-Muslim minorities).

A similar event in October 2016 took a different direction. Visiting the Temple Mount, Cardinal Marx and Bishop Bedford-Strohm, the preeminent Catholic and Protestant representatives of the German Churches, respectively, accepted orders and removed their crosses. After huge protests in Germany against the banning of the cross on the Temple Mount, the Cardinal Marx apologized. Bishop Bedford-Strohm, in contrast, did not apologize but blamed Israeli security — an allegation Israel rejected.

The Paris conference could well make the Temple Mount Judenrein and Christenrein [free of Christians and Jews] and accelerate dhimmitude in Europe.

An aerial view of the Temple Mount in Jerusalem, and much of Jerusalem’s Old City. (Image source: Andrew Shiva / Wikipedia)

For 3000 years, Jewish history says that “Jerusalem is built up like a city that is united together” (Psalms 122:3). Ever since, Jerusalem has been the undivided capital of the Jewish homeland. Neither relentless terror, nor multiple wars, nor cynical boycotts against the Jewish State have succeeded in destroying Israel’s history. In a rough move, however, the Paris peace conference and a subsequent Security Council vote could accomplish just that: the end of Jewish history in its homeland. Based on the Hamas Charter that denies Israel’s right to exist, the vote could complete eliminating Jewish — and Christian — history and replacing it with Islam. It would terminate Israel, the only thriving, beautiful, prosperous, and truly democratic country in the Middle East. It would end freedom of worship, which Israel guarantees for people of all religious faiths, from around whole world. It would end the inspiration for Judeo-Christian culture and for the faiths of Jews, Christians, and, yes, of Moslems, which Israel provides.

What drives Western politicians to be servants aiding the destruction of Judeo-Christian culture in the Middle East and Europe? Why does the Paris peace conference prepare for the destruction of the Jewish State, while Christians are murdered in Muslim countries in historically unparalleled numbers? Why are millions of Christians kept in the dark about the intended destruction of their birthplace on the Temple Mount from where, on Pentecost, the disciples of Jesus were empowered to carry the faith to the whole world? Not a few answers point to greed for might and money. It might be one of the Christians’ last chances to rescue and honor the Judeo-Christian patrimony, which has been built with love and faith and passed on through many perils over millennia.

Christians of this age are grateful to Israel for enabling the biblical faith, more than ever, through numerous archaeological findings on the Temple Mount, in the City of David, in Qumran, on Massada, in Beersheva, in Bethlehem, in Tekoah, in Ariel, at the Jordan river, in Jericho, in Capernaum, Megiddo, Nazareth, Tel Dan, and a hundred other biblical places in the Land of Israel.

For this, Christians will not be silent when all these places will be voted to go to those who will destroy them — as they destroyed Palmyra, Antioch, Nisibis, Nineveh, and in late 2014 Iraq’s oldest Christian monastery, St. Elijah, leveled by the Islamic State. It was reported how ISIS seized the Christian site, forcing the Christians to convert to Islam, paying a special tax or be killed. This is the reality familiar to Christians and Jews in the Middle East for more than a millennium.

The Judeo-Christian culture is based on history transmitted in Holy Writ. That needs to be addressed in public, on social media, in print media, on television and radio — on all media. The streets of Paris must hear the protests against the attempted rewriting of history at the peace conference and any subsequent Security Council vote. Such protestors are like “a man who would built up the wall and stand in front of God in the gap on behalf of the Land” (Ezekiel 22:30) — so that the only bastion of democracy, the very defender of Christianity, the last keeper of Judeo-Christian heritage in the Middle East and Europe will continue to prosper.

Rev. Dr. Petra Heldt is Director of the Ecumenical Theological Research Fraternity, Jerusalem.

5000-year-old Assyrian Culture Facing Devastation by Uzay Bulut

  • “After all, killing the ‘kafirs’ [non-believers of Islam] was a ‘good deed’. They were told ‘their place in heaven was guaranteed.’ Just like ISIS gangs… and that they would also take their relatives in hell to heaven.” — Sabri Atman, Assyrian Genocide and Research Center.


  • When ISIS invaded Mosul in August 2014, Christian families were told by ISIS: “We offer [Christians] three choices: Islam; the dhimma contract — involving payment… if they refuse this, they will have nothing but the sword.”

  • “There is a great parallel between 1915 and what is going on in the Middle East today. … The most effective way to prevent future slaughter is to condemn past slaughter. Denying such a big crime means its continuation. The wish for genocide still exists in the Middle East.” — Sabri Atman.

  • “The Turkish authorities let a few Assyrians stay to show Europe and the world how good-hearted and tolerant Turkey and Islam are. … And they say, ‘Assyrians lead their lives so happily thanks to this great tolerance!'” — Sabri Atman.

The recent invasions and massacres committed by the Islamic State (ISIS) and Al-Qaeda terrorists in Iraq and Syria have brought a persecuted but mostly forgotten people to the attention of the world: the Assyrians.

The Assyrians, a native people of Mesopotamia, have been exposed to massacres before — throughout history, in fact.

Due to these campaigns of extermination, the demographic character of the region has been changed greatly.

Before 1915, the population of the territory that is now Turkey was about 15 million, about 4.5 million of which was Christian (nearly a third). Today, one can hardly even talk of a Christian minority. The approximate population of Turkey is 80 million, but there are only around 120,000 Christians, less than 1% of the population.

In 1915, a slaughter of minorities took place, the purpose of which was apparently to “Turkify” and Islamize Anatolia into a country with one language, one flag, one religion and one nation. To achieve this objective, all non-Turkish communities — Armenians, Assyrians, Greeks, Jews, Yezidis, Kurds and others — were targeted.

But there was a difference between Christians and non-Christians. Non-Christian minorities were to be assimilated; Christians were to be exterminated.

According to the founder and the president of the Assyrian Genocide and Research Center (Seyfo Center)[1], Sabri Atman, there are links between the massacre of the Assyrians and the current massacres of Christians in the Middle East:

“Just like all Assyrians, when I was a child, I heard what had been done in 1915. The people were going through a trauma. Especially the elderly people still with fear in their voices fear about what they had experienced. Now I tell about the grievances of my people to try to get support for them.

“In the Ottoman Empire in 1915, the Ottoman-Turkish Party of Union and Progress slaughtered Christians — Armenians, Assyrians and Greeks. Most of the Assyrians were murdered with swords. Many Kurdish tribes also joined in the killings, using their swords — Seyfos — against their neighbors, the Assyrians.

“It is hard to give an exact number of victims; about 350,000 to 500,000 Assyrians lost their lives. The carnage was not only about murdering people. The lands and property of Christians were also seized. One of the most important outcomes of 1915 for many Turks was the wealth they built on the property of Armenians, Assyrians and Greeks. Today there is not a single Assyrian in provinces where once there were so many — so what happened to their lands, goods and property?

“It was the same with the Armenians and Greeks. The Cankaya Palace, the residence of former presidents of Turkey in Ankara, was originally the property of an Armenian, Odian Efendi. If you go to provinces where Armenians, Greeks and Assyrians used to live in Turkey, you would learn that all of the old and magnificent buildings you see used to belong to Armenians, Greeks or Assyrians.

“Some of the wealthy elite ruling Turkey became wealthy from property they forcibly took from the Christians. So one of the reasons they deny what happened in 1915 is that they are afraid one day they might lose the wealth they took cost-free.”

Other slaughters include:

  • Massacres by Badr Khan Beg, a Kurdish emir, against Assyrian Christians known as Nestorians. They took place in 1843-1846 in the province of Hakkari and throughout the Ottoman Empire.
  • Massacres against Armenians and Assyrians by the Hamidiye Corps in the Ottoman Empire in 1894 and 1896.
  • The Simele Massacre of August 7, 1933, by the armed forces of the Kingdom of Iraq. More than 3000 Assyrians were slaughtered, not only in the town of Simele. It also took place in the 68 Assyrian villages of the provinces of Duhok and Nineveh in Iraq.

“A lawyer who was profoundly influenced by the Simele massacre coined the term genocide,” Atman continued. “Raphael Lemkin called it genocide. He used word for the first time in 1944, and applied it to the Armenian massacre, the Holocaust and Simele massacre.”

In 2015, the extermination of Assyrians is still going on, as Assyrians and other Christian communities are being uprooted from countries in Middle Eastern. According to Atman:

“All of the data at hand shows that 1915 was a project of homogenizing Turkey. The Turkish Republic is a state largely established on Christian slaughters. But massacres against Assyrian people are not very much known even in Turkey. They have intentionally been hidden.

“Upon the prompting of Germany, on November 14, 1914, in all mosques of the Ottoman Empire, a call for jihad was made. Their main objective was to have Muslims in the British and French colonies start a riot, which would have empowered Germany and the Ottoman Empire. But things did not turn out the way they had planned.

“After the mosques sent out the call for jihad, many Muslims started massacres against Assyrians and other Christians. After all, killing the ‘kafirs’ [non-believers of Islam] was a ‘good deed’. They were told ‘their place in heaven was guaranteed.’ Just like ISIS gangs, they were also promised – based on the Quranic verses and the hadith – that they would get ’72 virgins’ and that they would also take their relatives in hell to heaven.”

When ISIS invaded Mosul in August 2014, Christian families were told by ISIS terrorists that they would be killed if they did not pay a protection tax (jizya) or convert to Islam. The warningwas read out in Mosul’s mosques and broadcast throughout the city on loudspeakers. “We offer [Christians] three choices: Islam; the dhimma contract – involving payment… if they refuse this, they will have nothing but the sword,” the announcement read.

On September 23, in Syria, ISIS executed three more Assyrians by gunshots to the back of their heads, the Assyrian International News Agency reported.

They were part of the group of 253 Assyrians abducted by ISIS on February 23, when it overran 35 Assyrian villages in Hasakah Province in Syria.

In the video recorded by ISIS that shows the execution, ISIS said that if ransom for the remaining Assyrians is not paid, they will be executed as well. ISIS has demanded $50,000 for each hostage, a total of more than $10 million.

On November 25, ISIS released ten more Assyrian Christian hostages in Hasakah Province, but over 150 remain captured and threatened with death.

“There is a great parallel between 1915 and what is going on in the Middle East today — in terms of destruction of non-Muslim civilizations and the continuity of Islamic jihad,” Atman said. The problem, according to Atman, does not stem from people’s belonging to certain ethnic groups; the problem is the denial of the realities of the past.

“Similar calls for jihad against Assyrians and Yezidis were made 100 years ago. Women and girls were raped; the Seyfo (sword) was used to behead people just as it is today.

“When the massacres and human rights violations of the past were not sentenced sufficiently, it paved the way for new massacres. The most effective way to prevent future slaughter is to condemn past slaughter. But the wish for genocide still exists in the Middle East, including Turkey. Turkey is still ruled by a President who says ‘Muslims do not commit genocide.'”

Left: A memorial in France commemorating the 1915 Assyrian Genocide in Turkey. Right: An Islamic State member destroys a Christian tombstone in Mosul, Iraq, in April 2015.

Throughout centuries, Islamic jihad has not changed but, sadly, even in the 21st century Turkish children are still taught a distorted version of history at their schools; as a result, generations are being raised to have a Turkish-Islamic supremacist mindset.

“We all have been exposed to a historical narrative based on lies,” Atman said about Turkish schools. “The official history of Turkey is, ‘Turkish propaganda for Turks.’ Information such as ‘The state of Turkey fought against imperialism’ is incorrect. The Ottoman Empire joined the First World War with imperialistic desires and formed an alliance with Germany. The war, presented as ‘the Turkish war of Liberation,’ was in a way a war to annihilate Christians, Alevis, Yezidis and other non-Muslim groups in Anatolia. So it would not be wrong to say that the Turkish Republic was established on Christian massacres and the denial of Kurds.”

Atman said that during his time in Turkey, he saw non-Turkish and non-Muslim children being exposed to forced assimilation at school.

“I was born in Turkey and went to primary, middle and high schools there. Before our classes got started, we sprang to attention and were made to read at the top of our voice the Turkish Student Oath in which we said, ‘I am a Turk’ and ‘My existence shall be dedicated to the Turkish existence.’ Textbooks claim that in the First World War, Assyrians and other Christians ‘stabbed Turkey in the back in cooperation with the imperialistic states’ and that Assyrians were ‘treacherous’. They brainwash Turkish schoolchildren like that; then the Muslim children look at the Assyrian children with suspicion.”

“When I was at middle school, we had a teacher; the moment he entered the classroom, he asked ‘Are there Christians here? Christians, raise your hands!’ A few children would shyly raise their hands. The look in his eyes spoke volumes. But the attitude of one teacher is never a criterion for assessing a whole society. The problem is not which ethnic group a person belongs to, but the monist ideology of Turkey [one language, one nation, one state, one religion] and its denial or distortion of history.”

Turkifying Anatolia and denying the identities of others is still rife, Atman said. “Turkish authorities still say that ‘Turkey belongs to Turks.’ That is a big lie. Before Turks came to Anatolia, we had been living there. But ‘Turkey belongs to Turks’ is still the slogan in the logo of one of Turkey’s best-selling newspapers.

“In any event, Assyrians are one of the most deeply-rooted indigenous peoples of Mesopotamia. Assyrians have lived on that land for more than 5000 years. The Turks came to Anatolia only in 1071. At least, that is what the Turkish textbooks say. They came later and drove us out.”

Assyrians still live with the consequences of the extermination campaign they were exposed to 100 years ago. The destruction is still going on. But that campaign of extermination is still denied today. Denying such a big crime means its continuation.

“In Turkey, there are still threats such as, ‘We will root them out’ or ‘We will exterminate them.’ To a large extent, they have succeeded. They murdered more than 300,000 Assyrians and forced almost another 300,000 to be exposed to assimilation in many countries across the world.”[2]

Today, in Turkey, there are only about 15,000 Assyrians left, and they are not officially recognized as a people.

“Assyrians are recognized only as a religious congregation, so that state authorities can benefit from them. They let these few stay to show Europe and the world how good-hearted and tolerant Turkey and Islam are. They talk about the ‘great tolerance’ of Turkey and Islam. And they say, ‘Assyrians lead their lives so happily thanks to this great tolerance!’

“What some people in Turkey proudly say is, ‘Elhamdulillah [thank Allah], 99% of Turkey is Muslim.’ They brag and boast about it. It should actually put them to shame; we know very well how they made it happen.

“What is done to Assyrians, Yezidis and others should concern everyone; what is massacred there is the humanity of everyone. If it happens there, it can happen to them. We ask all great powers of the world, everyone, to hear the screams of our people and help.”

Uzay Bulut, born and raised a Muslim, is a Turkish journalist based in Ankara.


[1] The Assyrian Genocide Research Center (Seyfo Center), an international organization headquartered in Sweden, was established in 2005 and has offices in Germany, Holland, Switzerland and the U.S. Sabri Atman, an award-winning human rights activist and researcher, is a member of the International Association of Genocide Scholars (IAGS). He has received countless awards and is now based in the U.S.

[2] According to Atman, it is estimated that Assyrians live in the U.S. (300,000), Australia (35,000), Europe (300,000), Canada (30,000), Iraq (500,000), Syria and Lebanon (50,000). There are Assyrian communities in Iran, Jordan, Argentina, Brazil and many other countries as well.

5 August 1914: England declares war on Germany A late-night meeting,

The Guardian, 5 August 1914: England declares war on Germany A late-night meeting, then a war declaration: a look back at how we reported the beginning of the first world war See the original page from the Manchester Guardian Guardian 1914: England declares war on Germany Photograph:

 


 

Guardian Tags: First world war , UK news, The Guardian, Germany Will Woodward Tuesday 5 August 2014 01.43 BST


The Manchester Guardian recorded 100 years ago on Tuesday that “Great Britain declared war on Germany at 11 o’clock last night,” and that an ultimatum from the cabinet to the German government had received an “unsatisfactory” reply and therefore “the King held at once a council which had been called for midnight”.


The paper is, of course, dominated by the war, which features substantially on seven of the 10 pages. That said, the first two pages featured only small ads and notices – news did not appear on the front page until 1952.

 

The page pictured is page 5. Among the pieces: a table of the estimated strength of the British and German fleets in the North Sea; two reports from Reuters in Berlin including “The Kaiser’s

 

Appeal to Germany”; photographs of Sir JR Jellicoe and Sir John French, “the command of the British forces on land and water”late news of a “German advance near Liege”; a story speculating “that at least 30,000 Manchester and Salford men will receive the call to arms”; and public correspondence between Sir Edward Grey, the foreign secretary and Sir George Buchanan, Britain’s ambassador to Russia, in St Petersburg (effectively reprinting an exchange between the German government and Tsar Nicholas II).

 


“We are authorised to publish thefollowing documents …” the paper explained.


The Guardian’s editor, CP Scott, who had urged Britain to stay neutral in the conflict, went to London on the day war was declared to see the prime minister, Lloyd George.

 

The leading article accepted that “Some time the responsibility for one of the greatest errors in our history will have to be fixed, but that time is not now.

 

Now there is nothing for Englishmen to do but to stand together and help by every means in their power to the attainment of our common object an early and decisive victory over Germany.” (“England” and “Britain” are used interchangeably.)

 

Elsewhere in the paper are signs that much of the world had yet to comprehend the scale of the coming catastrophe. It includes notes from “The Sunny South”, such as Bexhill


“Notwithstanding the tension caused by the international situation, there are a large number of visitors here for the commencement of the high season”; and also three columns of cricket reports and scores, including an “intensely keen” match between Lancashire and Yorkshire at Old Trafford, including seven wickets for England allrounder Wilfred Rhodes.

 

More on this story Enemies in life, comrades in death: a century to count the cost of war 4 Aug 2014 Unknown fallen of the first world war honoured in schoolgirl’s remembrance 4 Aug 2014


Europe’s leaders hail ties of peace as they mark first world war centenary 4 Aug 2014 Peace campaigners protest at official commemorations of first world war 4 Aug 2014 David Cameron attends first world war commemoration service at Glasgow cathedral – video

By Gwynne Dyer

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